Chinese dating system

Rated 4.76/5 based on 972 customer reviews

Despite all the limitations, the show was a groundbreaking depiction of courtship.It took decisions about love and marriage from the private home to the very public domain of broadcast TV.There have been some consequences to this shift: as TV became more commercialized, so, too, did love and marriage.By the late 2000s, dating shows needed to continue to evolve in order to compete with other programs.For Chinese romance, this was its own “great leap forward.” By the early 1990s, Chinese TV networks found themselves in fierce competition with one another.Economic liberalization had loosened restrictions for what could appear on the airwaves, but there was now the added pressure of turning a profit.However, even in the wake of political change and globalization, many families still held the traditional Chinese belief that women, unlike men, belonged in the home, and that their parents had the final say over whom they could marry.

Today, dating shows are an important ingredient in China’s cultural diet, with popular shows like “If You Are the One” and “One Out of a Hundred” attracting millions of viewers.

But over the past 30 years, these customs have been upended.

I’ve studied how traditional Chinese marriage rituals have evolved in response to globalization.

By 2000, that number had skyrocketed to 32.6 percent.

Meanwhile, divorces in China rose from 170,449 couples in 1978 to 3.5 million in 2013, while marriages with foreigners increased from less than 8,500 couples in 1979 to over 49,000 couples in 2010.

Leave a Reply