Protective factors latina dating violence

Rated 3.96/5 based on 881 customer reviews

Teen dating violence is also associated with negative outcomes in adulthood.A 2013 study found that five years after a violent teen relationship, female victims reported increased adult intimate violence victimization, heavy drinking episodes, suicidal ideation, depressive symptoms, smoking, and marijuana use compared to females who hadn’t experienced teen dating violence.The reality is that many teens are learning to abuse and be abused by their dates.Unfortunately, research shows that 13% of teens who are either victims or perpetrators of intimate partner violence will be involved in more than one abusive relationship in a year.For example, a 2009 study found that emotional abuse during childhood was associated with being a perpetrator or victim of teen dating violence for boys and a victim for girls.The bad news for parents and other caring adults is that they are unlikely to be told about these incidents of teen dating violence, making it difficult to deal with the problem.The 2015 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that 1 in 10 adolescents have been hit, pushed, or hurt by a weapon or other object by a dating partner.

Positive behavior by community members has been shown to reduce the likelihood of dating violence.However, some studies have found girls reported being the aggressor in dating violence more often than males.For instance, a 2010 study of sixth graders found that 31% of girls reported being the perpetrators of dating violence while only 27% of boys admitted being violent.In contrast, a negative home environment and community factors such as child maltreatment, low levels of parental supervision, and exposure to family violence are all risk factors for dating violence.In order to decrease the incidence of youth dating violence, adolescents must learn what a healthy relationship is and learn that they have the power to identify and stop abusive and controlling behavior.

Leave a Reply