Scientific proof against carbon dating

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Thus all the right mutations (and none of the destructive ones) must happen at the same time by pure chance. To illustrate just how hopeless it is, imagine this: on the ground are all the materials needed to build a house (nails, boards, shingles, windows, etc.).We tie a hammer to the wagging tail of a dog and let him wander about the work site for as long as you please, even millions of years.Sweeps "were too infrequent within the past 250,000 years to have had discernible effects on genomic diversity." "Classic sweeps were not a dominant mode of human adaptation over the past 250,000 years." --Hernandez, Ryan D., Joanna L. Cord Melton, Adam Auton, Gilean Mc Vean, 1000 Genomes Project, Guy Sella, Molly Przeworski. Classic Selective Sweeps Were Rare in Recent Human Evolution. There were many mutations, but none caught on, and the experiment ran into the . The ability to use citrate in the presence of oxygen, trumpeted by evolutionists as a big deal, was the result of previously existing information being rearranged, not the origin of new information.They wrote that "forward experimental evolution can often be completely reversed with these populations". Mutations that result in a gain of novel information have not been observed.Scientists like to study them because a generation (from egg to adult) takes only 9 days. Here is how the imaginary part is supposed to happen: On rare occasions a mutation in DNA improves a creature's ability to survive, so it is more likely to reproduce (natural selection).

That is how the idea of biological evolution has spread since 1859. The types of bird beaks, the colors of moths, leg sizes, etc. Each type and length of beak a finch can have is already in the gene pool and adaptive mechanisms of finches.It might even work if it took just one gene to make and control one part.But parts of living creatures are constructed of intricate components with connections that all need to be in place for the thing to work, controlled by many genes that have to act in the proper sequence.Whenever variation is pushed to extremes by selective breeding (to get the most milk from cows, sugar from beets, bristles on fruit flies, or any other characteristic), the line becomes sterile and dies out.And as one characteristic increases, others diminish.

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